Home Stories What Isolation Really Is Because It’s Not Just Being Alone And Feeling Sad

What Isolation Really Is Because It’s Not Just Being Alone And Feeling Sad

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Isolation is coziness. It’s comfort. It’s a blanket that warms your soul and makes you feel safe. It’s so pleasant that it stops you from being scared to be alone. It makes you feel that being alone is the definition of happiness.  

Isolation is being at peace with yourself. It is a feeling you get when you realize that you don’t need to think of things to say. It’s a realization that it is better to not be too sensitive and too reactive all the time. 

Isolation is hearing your long shut voice again. It’s reclaiming yourself after being silenced for so long. Because sometimes it takes the sweet confinement of silence to feel alive again. 

Isolation is feeling calm. It’s hearing your heart and falling in love with yourself again. It’s getting to know yourself better. 

Isolation is hearing the voices in your head a little bit louder, stronger, more convincing, and more persistent than ever before. It’s a feeling you get when all your senses are so amplified that you can actually smell and taste your own thoughts and feelings. 

Isolation is bravery and strength. 

Isolation is sometimes the only light at the end of the tunnel. 

Isolation is sometimes your only true friend. However, this friend won’t make you laugh until your belly hurts. This friend is your hidden and silent tears. It’s a sob that you don’t want anyone to see. 

Isolation is a feeling of relief. It’s the ride of your life that is taking you away from everything that was suffocating you and holding you back. It’s what it brings to your true self again. 

Isolation is a denial of any human interaction and connection. Practice it with care. Don’t turn your back on the love and warmth of being with someone you love and care for. 

Embrace everything that makes you smile. Don’t underestimate the power of a hug that mends all the broken pieces together. 

Mary Wright

Mary Wright is a professional writer with more than 10 years of incessant practice. Her topics of interest gravitate around the fields of the human mind and the interpersonal relationships of people.
Mary Wright