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5 Everyday Habits That Are Making You Feel More Miserable, Depressed And Anxious

When you deal with a 24/7 severe stress, continuous anxiety attacks and depression you begin to make constant attempts to improve your life. You start looking for a solution, something that will help you solve the chaos in your minds.

So, you start a new yoga class, you go for a hike, you try cutting the toxic people out of your life, talking to a therapist, changing the scenery, surrounding yourself with the right crowd. Whatever makes your calmer and more at peace, you do it.

Because you know that mental health is something that should never be compromised.

However, there are some unexpected, yet very common habits that according to studies have the power to make you even more anxious and depressed. These habits are usually a very familiar part of our everyday routines, something that we usually overlook and fail to realize until it’s too late.

So here are 5 seemingly ordinary, yet detrimental habits that make you moody, depressed and anxious:

1. DRINKING RIDICULOUS AMOUNTS OF COFFEE

I know, this statement is like telling the whole world to stop breathing. Believe it or not, it’s that crazy. There are people who can’t imagine their work day without infusing 3 cups of coffee into their system.

However, studies have shown that there is a link between an excessive intake of caffeine and depression, anxiety or moodiness. Also, caffeine is a psychoactive stimulant that increases your alertness, wakefulness and overall, boosts your energy levels.

For people who already struggle with depression, an excessive intake of caffeine can even worsen their mood.

2. AVOIDING PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

Staying physically active is known to be incredibly beneficial for our overall wellbeing.

Therefore, adopting the habit of staying lazy and inactive can not only result in cardiovascular risks and similar health problems, but it can also trigger the possibility of developing a mild depression or anxiety disorder.

Studies have shown that leading a physically active lifestyle (which results in your body releasing the hormones of happiness) will make you feel happier, increase your energy levels, regulate your blood pressure, strengthen your heart muscles and also improve your mood and reduce your anxiety.

3. WASTING YOUR ENERGY ON EXCESSIVE SCREEN TIME

Even though we consider our Instagram time a fun and relaxing, after work activity, excessive screen time can be the biggest factor for both sudden moodiness and depression.

The white light that it’s emitted by the screen can simultaneously cause a sense of fatigue and drowsiness.

4. OVERDOING THE SIMPLE CARBS

Carbohydrates are an essential ingredient for energy and maintaining those healthy serotonin levels. However, there’s an important difference between complex and simple carbohydrates.

Simple carbohydrates that are mainly sugary, processed foods and candies are easily processed and broken down inside your body. They are quick energy boosters, however, as a result, they can increase rapid fluctuations in your blood sugars, which can result in sudden mood changes.

What’s worse, a greater drop in blood sugars, can release an excessive amount of stress hormones that can cause irritability, and anxiousness.

5. ADOPTING A BLACK OR WHITE THINKING

Life isn’t black and white. It’s a colorful dimension which sadly cannot be perceived by every person out there.

Some of us like to define things based on their one-sided point of view. That if we were great at everything else, but failed at one thing, we’re instantly a failure.

To me, this is an extremely detrimental and depressive way to live your life. This kind of thinking can be the root cause for many mental health issues.

If you find yourself in this situation, try to focus more on the other positive aspects of your life. Life cannot be defined by one silly failure or mistake. You are so much more than that.

SOURCES:
HTTPS://WWW.NCBI.NLM.NIH.GOV/PUBMED/26303345
HTTPS://WWW.NCBI.NLM.NIH.GOV/PMC/ARTICLES/PMC474733/
HTTPS://WWW.KARGER.COM/ARTICLE/ABSTRACT/277001
HTTP://PSYCNET.APA.ORG/RECORD/1995-24393-001

Stephanie Reeds

Stephanie Reeds

A professional writer with many years of experience in the fields of psychology, human relationships, science, and spirituality.
Stephanie Reeds